March Study Question of the Month

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Comment below or submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $20 Starbucks gift card.***

This question is relevant to the Series 14, 79, 82, and SIE exams.

Question:

A research analyst who works for an underwriter that participated in an IPO may not publicly discuss or write a research report about the company until __________________.

Answer Choices:

A. 30 days after the registration is filed 

B. 20 days after the securities are issued

C. 10 days after the date of the IPO

D. 30 days after the date of the IPO


To explore free samples of Solomon Exam Prep’s industry-leading online exam simulators for the SIE, Series 14, Series 79, Series 82, and many more exams, visit the Solomon website here.

January Study Question of the Month

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Comment below or submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $20 Starbucks gift card.***

This question is relevant to the SIE, Series 6, 7, 22, 24, and 82 exams.

Question:

Which of the following people would be considered a specified adult?

Answer Choices:

A. A 16 year old with autism

B. A 30 year old

C. A 60 year old with a heart condition

D. An 18 year old in a coma

Correct Answer: D

Explanation: A specified adult is a natural person age 65 and older or a natural person age 18 and older who the member firm reasonably believes has a mental or physical impairment that renders the individual unable to protect his or her own interests.

SEC Announces Major Revisions to Registration Exemptions Aimed at “Harmonizing” Regulation A Offerings, Regulation D Private Placements, and Crowdfunding

On November 2, the SEC announced a collection of rule changes meant to, in the announcement’s words, “harmonize, simplify, and improve” its “overly complex exempt offering framework.” Continue reading

On November 2, the SEC announced a collection of rule changes meant to, in the announcement’s words, “harmonize, simplify, and improve” its “overly complex exempt offering framework.” The changes affect Regulation A, which governs small public offerings; Regulation D, which governs private placements; and Regulation CF, which governs crowdfunding. This system of exemptions allows various small offerings to avoid the normal registration process required by the Securities Act.  
 
The rule changes should provide a clearer choice as to which exemption is most appropriate to an issuer, based on how much the issuer needs to raise and other factors.
 
The changes also seek to clarify how issuers can avoid “integration” of exempt offerings. Integration is the risk that exempt offerings will be considered a single offering by the SEC, because the offerings are too similar.
 
Highlights of the changes include:
 
  • If two exempt offerings are conducted more than 30 days apart, they are almost always protected from integration.
  • An issuer can “test the waters” with potential investors before deciding which exemption it will use for an offering. Test-the-waters communications solicit interest in a potential offering before the issuer has filed anything with the SEC. Previously, an issuer could only test the waters after deciding that its potential offering would take place under Regulation A.
  • Caps on the amount that may be raised through these exemptions have been increased:
    • Crowdfunding: from $1.07 million to $5 million
    • Regulation A, Tier 2: from $50 million to $75 million 
    • Regulation D, Rule 504: from $5 million to $10 million
  • Make “bad actor” exclusions more consistent across different exemptions.
The rule changes will take effect early next year. Until the changes take effect, securities exam questions will continue to be based on the old rules. FINRA Exams affected by these rule changes include the SIE, Series 6, Series 7, Series 14, Series 22, Series 24, Series 65, Series 66, Series 79, and Series 82.

Passing Your Securities Exam May Now Make You an Accredited Investor

On Wednesday, the SEC finalized rule changes that will broaden its definition of “accredited investor” to encompass industry professionals who have earned certain FINRA licenses. Continue reading

On Wednesday, the SEC finalized rule changes that will broaden its definition of “accredited investor” to encompass industry professionals who have earned certain FINRA licenses.
 
An accredited investor is an investor considered sophisticated enough to weigh an investment’s merits independently. Accredited investors have easier access to certain types of investments, such as private equity offerings.
 
Under the newly expanded definition, General Securities Representatives (Series 7), Private Securities Offerings Representatives (Series 82), and Licensed Investment Adviser Representatives (Series 65) are now accredited investors. The SEC indicated that it may add other FINRA licenses later.
 
The rule change also allows “spousal equivalents” such as domestic partners to qualify as accredited investors based on the total income and assets of both partners, a benefit previously limited to couples who are legally married. Native American tribes and foreign governments now qualify as accredited investors as well.
 
The Solomon Exam Prep team is always on the lookout for how current developments affect the securities industry. For more updates from our Industry News blog, use the subscribe form on this page.

Study Question of the Month – May 2016

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available! Relevant to the Series 7, 62 and 82. —ANSWER POSTED— Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available!

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 7Series 62 and Series 82): Which of the following is not true of commercial paper?

Answers:

A. It is used to cover an issuer’s short-term needs such as payroll and inventory

B. It typically matures in less than 90 days, but it can have a term as long as 397 days.

C. It is generally issued in lots of $100,000, but they can be sold at a discount in the primary market

D. Highly rated commercial paper is generally considered safe enough to be purchased by money market funds, but it is rarely purchased by retail investors.

Correct Answer: B. It typically matures in less than 90 days, but it can have a term as long as 397 days.

Rationale: Large corporations, banks, and financial firms with high credit ratings may issue commercial paper to cover short-term needs, such as payroll and inventory, and to finance general operations. Commercial paper is unsecured and issued at a discount, and typically matures in less than 90 days, although it can have a term as long as 270 days. It is generally issued in lots of $100,000, but they can be sold at discount in the primary market. Even though it is unsecured, because it is short-term and issued only by banks and large corporations with high credit ratings, commercial paper is generally considered safe enough to be purchased by money market funds, but it is rarely purchased by retail investors.

Congratulations Alexander B. this month’s Study Question of the Month winner!

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Study Question of the Month – April 2016

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available! Relevant to the Series 6, 7, 24, 26, 62, and 82. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available!

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 6, Series 7, Series 24, Series 26, Series 62, and Series 82): Which of the following would most likely be classified as a branch office?

Answers: 

A. The floor of a registered exchange

B. A vacation home where the registered representative works for 45 business days a year

C. A customer service office where no sales activities are conducted

D. A location used primarily for non-securities activities and from which 25 securities transactions are effected a year

Correct Answer: B. A vacation home where the registered representative works for 45 business days a year

Rationale: A branch office is any location where one or more associated employees is in the business of soliciting or effecting (but not executing) the purchase or sale of any security.

A location outside of a primary residence, for example, a vacation home, is considered a non-branch location as long as it is used for securities business fewer than 30 business days per year.

The floor of a registered exchange is also considered a non-branch office if it is where a member firm conducts business with public customers.

Other examples of non-branch offices include:

  • Any location that is used primarily to engage in non-securities activities and from which the associated persons effect no more than 25 securities transactions in any one calendar year (provided that any retail communication identifying such location also sets forth the address and telephone number of the location from which the associated persons conducting business at the non-branch locations are directly supervised)
  • Any office location established solely for customer service and/or back office type functions where no sales activities are conducted

Congratulations to Alexa M. this month’s Study Question of the Month winner!

Solomon’s Industry News: November 2015 Edition

Solomon Exam Prep is happy to release this month’s edition of “Solomon’s Industry News.” Continue reading

Solomon Exam Prep is happy to release this month’s edition of “Solomon’s Industry News.” Every month we will send out industry updates from the past month, so you can stay current and up-to-date on everything that is happening here at Solomon Exam Prep and in the industry.

Check out this month’s edition here: Solomon’s Industry News – November 2015.

To be added to our monthly mailing list, please click here.

New Series 82 Exam Study Guide

The securities world is constantly changing, and Solomon Exam Prep works to provide you with the most accurate and up-to-date exam materials on the market. Our brand new 2nd edition of The Solomon Exam Prep Guide to the Series 82 Limited Representative – Private Securities Offerings Representative Exam features 100 new practice questions, new visuals and examples, and expanded material on subjects throughout the book… Continue reading

9781610070874 cov.inddThe securities world is constantly changing, and Solomon Exam Prep works to provide you with the most accurate and up-to-date exam materials on the market.  Our brand new 2nd edition of The Solomon Exam Prep Guide to the Series 82 Limited Representative – Private Securities Offerings Representative Exam features 100 new practice questions, new visuals and examples, and expanded material on subjects throughout the book, including:

      • Updated FINRA rules
      • Regulation A+
      • Regulation D
      • Money market instruments
      • Insider trading
      • New suitability rules
      • Taxation

and much more that you will need to know to pass the Series 82 and sell private placements.

The Series 82 is a difficult exam, but with our guide you will approach the test fully prepared and be ready to enter the private securities industry with knowledge and expertise.  As Solomon Exam Prep President Jeremy Solomon says, “The increase in the numbers of people taking the Series 82 has mirrored the rise in the sale of private securities.  The Series 82 isn’t as extensive as some other FINRA exams, but it is not an easy exam for most test-takers.  That’s because three-quarters of the exam is on the regulation of securities and handling customer accounts, topics many professionals in the world of private placements may not be familiar with.  Becoming familiar with securities industry rules and laws generally means reading and practicing, something busy securities professionals often have difficulty finding the time for. That’s why Solomon study materials are so valuable — they make the process highly efficient and guide test-takers to success.”

Solomon Exam Prep has helped thousands of financial professionals pass their FINRA, NASAA, and MSRB securities regulatory exams including the Series 6, 7, 24, 26, 27, 28, 51, 52, 53, 55, 62, 63, 65, 66, 79, 82, and 99. The Solomon Exam Prep training system includes print and digital Exam Study Guides, Online Exam Simulators, Audiobooks, and Video Lectures to address the learning needs of all kinds of test-takers.

FINRA Enacts New Rule 2040 on Payments to Unregistered Persons

FINRA Rule 2040 became effective August 24, 2015. It replaces NASD Rules 2420 and 1060(b). This change affects the Series 6, 7, 24, 26, 27, 28, 62, and 82 exams. Continue reading

Exam AlertFINRA Rule 2040 became effective August 24, 2015.  It replaces NASD Rules 2420 and 1060(b).  This change affects the Series 6, 7, 24, 26, 27, 28, 62, and 82 exams.

FINRA Rule 2040 explains that an entity must register as a broker-dealer in order to receive commissions and fees for a securities transaction, unless it is a transaction that does not require registration.  FINRA does not explicitly outline which transactions do not require registration, but it states that member firms can make this determination on their own by:

  • Relying on releases, no-action letters, and interpretations from the SEC
  • Requesting a no-action letter from the SEC
  • Seeking a legal opinion

Rule 2040 further states that retired representatives may continue to be paid commissions on customer accounts if the representative and member have agreed upon the continuing payments before retirement.

Finally, Rule 2040 (c) states that members may conduct transactions with foreign finders as long as certain requirements are met, including:

  • The member firm is sure that the finder does not need to register as a broker-dealer in the U.S. and the compensation arrangement doesn’t violate foreign law
  • Neither the finder nor the customer is a U.S. citizen, and both live abroad
  • Customers receive a document disclosing the compensation paid to the finder by the member firm
  • Customers acknowledge receipt of this disclosure to the member firm in writing, which the firm retains and keeps available for inspection
  • Confirmation of each transaction indicates that a finder’s fee is being paid by written agreement

Source: Regulatory Notice 15-07