What are the permitted activities of a General Securities Representative (Series 7)?

In this article, Solomon Exam Prep explains what a General Securities Representative can and cannot do and how this compares to other rep-level registrations. Continue reading

Of the representative-level FINRA registrations categories, the General Securities Representative (Series 7) registration is considered by many to be the most valuable, due to the range of products it allows you to sell. But how “general” is it? Are there other representative-level registrations that permit you do things a Series 7 representative cannot?

What is a Series 7 representative permitted to do?

FINRA allows a General Securities Representative to solicit the purchase and sales of all securities products, including:

  • Stocks, whether from IPOs, private placements, or secondary market trading
  • Other corporate securities, such as bonds, rights, and warrants
  • Mutual funds
  • Closed-end funds
  • Money market funds
  • Unit investment trusts (UITs)
  • Exchange-traded funds (ETFs)
  • Real estate investment trusts (REITs)
  • Variable contracts (insurance products whose funds are invested in securities)
  • Municipal securities
  • Municipal fund securities, such as 529 plans
  • Options
  • Government securities
  • Direct participation programs (DPPs)
  • Venture capital
  • Hedge funds

This long list of products means that a Series 7 registered rep may perform the functions of an Investment Company and Variable Contracts Representative (Series 6), Direct Participation Programs Representative (Series 22), or Private Securities Offerings Representative (Series 82).

Besides sales, General Securities Representatives may also perform certain activities closely related to sales. They may:

  • recommend investments after performing a suitability analysis for the customer
  • accept unsolicited orders
  • open customer accounts, subject to approval by a principal

What is a Series 7 representative not permitted to do?

Though a General Securities Representative may solicit purchases of IPO shares, he may not work on underwriting or structuring an IPO, or any other securities offerings. This means that he is not permitted to advise an issuer on an offering. This work requires registration as an Investment Banking Representative (Series 79).  Likewise, working on municipal underwriting requires registration as a Municipal Securities Representative (Series 52).

A Series 7 representative is also not qualified to perform the back-office functions of an Operations Professional (Series 99). Among these functions are maintaining possession or control of the firm’s securities, calculating margin for margin accounts, and sending trade confirmations and account statements.

Of course, every registered representative must also pass the FINRA Securities Industry Essentials (SIE) exam. The SIE doesn’t qualify you to do anything, instead it is a foundational exam that focuses on industry terminology, securities products, the structure and function of the markets, regulatory agencies and their functions, and regulated and prohibited practices. Unlike other FINRA securities exams, you do not need to be employed or sponsored by a broker-dealer in order to take the SIE. The only requirement is that you be 18 years old.

If you are considering taking the Series 7 exam, Solomon Exam Prep is here to help you. Solomon provides an extensive array of study material, together with resources such as study schedules, the Ask The Professor function, and important exam information. You can view our Series 7 offerings here.

 

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If You’re a Principal or Operations Professional, Your FINRA Exam Deadline May Be Extended

If you’re a newly promoted principal at your firm, FINRA may have just delivered you some good news. Continue reading

If you’re a newly promoted principal at your firm, FINRA may have just delivered you some good news.

In response to current events, FINRA has adopted a temporary rule change giving many new principals until December 31st to complete their FINRA exams.

To qualify for the extension, the principal must have been promoted from representative by her firm before September 3rd.

Among the principals included in the extension are General Securities Principals (Series 24), Financial and Operations Principals (Series 27 or 28), Investment Company/Variable Contract Limited Principals (Series 26), and Compliance Officers (Series 14).

The extension also applies to one rep-level license. Operations Professionals (Series 99) hired before September 3rd also have until December 31st to pass their exams.

The Solomon Exam Prep team is always on the lookout for how current developments affect the securities industry. For more updates from our Industry News blog, use the subscribe form on this page.

Solomon’s Industry News: November 2015 Edition

Solomon Exam Prep is happy to release this month’s edition of “Solomon’s Industry News.” Continue reading

Solomon Exam Prep is happy to release this month’s edition of “Solomon’s Industry News.” Every month we will send out industry updates from the past month, so you can stay current and up-to-date on everything that is happening here at Solomon Exam Prep and in the industry.

Check out this month’s edition here: Solomon’s Industry News – November 2015.

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Exam Alert: FINRA Provides Guidance on Communications

On May 22, 2015, FINRA issued guidance concerning communications with the public. Here are some notable points from the guidance… Continue reading

Exam Alert

On May 22, 2015, FINRA issued guidance concerning communications with the public. Here are some notable points from the guidance.

  • Non-promotional communications (i.e. communications that do not promote or recommend a specific product or service) do not need to be filed with FINRA
  • Electronic forum posts are considered retail communication, but are specifically excluded from filing requirements
  • Template updates do not need to be filed with FINRA if all that changed was statistical information
  • Various non-material changes to previously filed communications do not require refiling the communication
  • A reprinted article does not need to be filed with FINRA
  • Promotional items that only have the name of a mutual fund are not considered “advertisements” under Rule 482
  • If a firm includes mutual fund performance in a retail communication or correspondence, they must also include the fund’s expense ratio
  • Firm must file retail communications regarding registered business development companies
  • A Series 26 registration does not permit a principal to approve retail communications concerning a business development company. The principal must have a Series 24, Series 9/10, or Series 39 registration instead.

Sources:
Regulatory Notice 15-17: Guidance on Rules Governing Communications With the Public
FINRA Rule 2210 Questions and Answers

This alert applies to the Series 6, Series 7, Series 9/10, Series 24, Series 26, Series 39, Series 62, Series 82, and Series 99.

Study Question of the Month – June

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Relevant to the Series 24, 26, 27, 28, 62, and 99. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 24Series 26Series 27, Series 28, Series 62, and Series 99):

Which of the following is true regarding lost and stolen security reporting requirements?

I. All reports of securities that have been lost for one business day should be reported to the Commission

II. All reports of lost securities in which there is a substantial belief that theft was involved should be reported to the Commission

III. All reports of lost or stolen securities should be reported promptly to the FBI

IV. All reports of lost securities in which there is a substantial belief that theft was involved should be reported to the FBI

Answers:

A. I and III

B. II and IV

C. I and IV

D. II and III

Correct Answer: B. II and IV

Rationale: All reports in which there is substantial belief that theft was involved should be reported to the Commission within one business day of such a discovery. In addition, when there is believed to be criminal activity involved, it should be reported to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Securities that have been lost for two business days should be reported to the Commission when criminal activity is not suspected.

Congratulations Roseann L., this month’s Study Question of the Month winner!

All study questions are from Solomon’s industry-leading Online Exam Simulator.

Study Question of the Month – March

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Relevant to the Series 7, 24, 27, 62, 79, 82, and 99. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 7, Series 24, Series 27, Series 62, Series 79, Series 82, and Series 99):

Jenny is an employee of a broker-dealer. She is a receptionist at the firm and is not a registered representative. She would like to purchase shares in an IPO that she has recently heard about at her office. Which of the following BEST describes her participation?

Answers:

A. Jenny may purchase shares of the IPO on the same basis as other customers.

B. Jenny is prohibited from purchasing shares of the IPO, but her spouse who she supports may purchase shares on the same basis as other customers.

C. Jenny may purchase shares of the IPO as long as the purchase quantity doesn’t exceed 200 shares.

D. Jenny is prohibited from purchasing shares of the IPO.

Correct Answer: D. Jenny is prohibited from purchasing shares of the IPO.

Rationale: FINRA Rule 5130 – Restrictions on the Purchase and Sale of Initial Equity Public Offerings – prohibits a member firm (broker/dealer) from selling shares of an IPO to an account in which a “restricted person“ has a beneficial interest, subject to certain limited exceptions. All employees of a broker-dealer are considered “restricted persons“ under the rule.

Congratulations! This month’s winner is Alexandra K.

Weekly study questions are from Solomon’s industry-leading Online Exam Simulator.

Study Question of the Month – January

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Submit your answer for a chance to win a $10 Starbucks gift card! Relevant to the Series 7, 24, 26, 27, 51, 52, 53, 62, 79, 82, 99. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

 Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 7Series 24, Series 26, Series 27, Series 51, Series 52, Series 53Series 62Series 79, Series 82, Series 99) 

Jon and Jenny are married. They each have an individual account and they have a joint account owned by both of them. What is the combined maximum SIPC coverage for all their accounts?

Answers:

A. $500,000

B. $1,000,000

C. $1,500,000

D. $750,000

Correct Answer: C. $1,500,000

Rationale: SIPC covers a maximum of $500,000 per “separate customer” at a broker-dealer or clearing firm including up to $250,000 in cash.Total coverage can be higher for multiple accounts if the accounts are considered to be held by separate customers. There are five categories of separate customers defined by SIPC. These categories include 1) individual accounts, 2) joint accounts, 3) accounts held by executors, administrators, and guardians/custodians/conservators (such as UGMA accounts), 4) accounts held by corporations, partnerships, or unincorporated associations, and 5) trust accounts. Thus, two individual accounts held by two different people, and one joint account would be considered three separate customers by the SIPC, and therefore subject to a maximum of $1,500,000 of coverage.

Congratulations! This month’s winner is Abe B.

Weekly study questions are from Solomon’s industry-leading Online Exam Simulator.

Exam Alert: FINRA Adds Additional FOCUS Report Supplement

Effective December 31, 2014, certain firms that are required to file FOCUS reports will be required to file an additional form called the Supplemental Inventory Schedule. Continue reading

Exam AlertEffective December 31, 2014, certain firms that are required to file FOCUS reports will be required to file an additional form called the Supplemental Inventory Schedule. On this form, firms report their gross long and short inventory positions in specified categories of securities and commodities. The requirement does not apply to firms that have (1) a minimum dollar net capital or liquid capital requirement of less than $100,000 or (2) inventory positions consisting only of money market mutual funds.

Source: FINRA Regulatory Notice 14-43: SEC Approves Supplemental Inventory Schedule

This alert applies to the Series 26 and Series 99.