November Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the SIESeries 7, Series 24, Series 79, and Series 82.

 

 

 

 

 

Which of the following would not necessarily be restricted shares when you purchase them?:

A. Shares sold by the CEO of the issuing company

B. Shares sold by the CEO’s wife of the issuing company

C. Shares sold by the assistant to the CEO of the issuing company

D. Shares sold by a major shareholder (more than 10% ownership) of the issuing company

May Study Question of the Month

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.*** Continue reading

Congratulations to Diane K., this month’s Study Question of the Month winner! 

See the answer below!

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Question (Relevant to the Series 7, Series 52, Series 65, Series 66, Series 79)

When the yield curve inverts, that is, when short-term interest rates are higher than long-term interest rates, all of the following are true EXCEPT: 

A. It indicates low or no inflation expectations.

B. It indicates higher demand for long-term bonds and lower demand for short-term bonds.

C. It indicates an economic recession.

D. It indicates an economic expansion.

Answer: D. A yield curve plots the yields of similar bonds based on the term of the bond (maturity) and the yield of the bonds, with term on the x-axis and yield on the y-axis.  A normal yield curve is upward sloping, indicating that the longer the term of the bond, the higher yield (interest rate).  This is because in normal economic conditions, the longer the term of the investment, the greater the risk that interest rates or the economy will change. Thus investors require greater compensation for uncertainties and risks associated with committing their money for longer time periods. This is called the risk premium.  When the yield curve is inverted, however, it slopes downward instead of upward. This means that there is higher demand for long-term bonds compared to short-term bonds because investors believe that interest rates will fall in the future.  Also, it means that investors are not concerned about inflation. These conditions are associated with a future economic recession.

It’s Settled: SEC Shortens Regular-Way to T+2

If you’ve ever traded securities or studied for a securities licensing exam, then you’ve probably come across T+3. No, it’s not an herbal supplement or an embarrassing medical procedure. Continue reading

If you’ve ever traded securities or studied for a securities licensing exam, then you’ve probably come across T+3. No, it’s not an herbal supplement or an embarrassing medical procedure. T+3 refers to the regular-way settlement period for most securities transactions. This means that securities must be paid for and delivered by three business days from the trade date. T+3 also means you don’t become the owner of record of a security until three business days after you purchase it.

Well, add T+3 to the list of things that have gone out of style. Effective May 30, 2017, the SEC will shorten the regular-way settlement period to two business days. And so will begin the age of T+2, which is intended to “increase efficiency and reduce risk for market participants,” according to SEC Acting Chairman Michael Pinowar.

This shorter settlement period for the trading of secondary market securities has been discussed by the SEC for years. The change is expected to lower margin requirements for clearing agency members, reduce liquidity stress when markets are volatile, and harmonize settlement with European markets, which moved to T+2 in 2014.

This settlement period will not apply to every securities transaction, though. T+2, like T+3 before it, will apply to:

  • Stocks
  • Bonds
  • Municipal securities
  • Exchange-traded funds
  • Mutual funds traded through a brokerage firm
  • Unit investment trusts
  • Limited partnerships that trade on an exchange

The securities industry moves fast. Don’t get left behind! Visit www.solomonexamprep.com or call us at 503-601-0212 for more information about the latest securities exam preparation and education.

Solomon has helped thousands pass their Series 6, Series 7, Series 24, Series 26, Series 27, Series 28, Series 50, Series 51, Series 52, Series 53, Series 62, Series 63, Series 65, Series 66, Series 79, Series 82, and Series 99.

Announcing the Release of the Solomon Exam Prep Android Mobile App!

With the release of the Solomon Exam Prep app, you have full mobile access to your Solomon study materials with the click of a button. Continue reading

Do you need to take a securities licensing exam?

Do you wish you had more time to study?

With the release of the Solomon Exam Prep Android app, you have full mobile access to your Solomon study materials at the click of a button.

  • Easier and quicker—Just click the Solomon Exam Prep icon on your phone to be taken directly to your account.
  • Access all your materials—The app provides full site functionality and access to your study guide, exam simulator, audiobook, and video lecture.
  • No typing on tiny keyboards—Don’t worry about typing in a web address! Our app will take you right where you need to be.

Move into the future of mobile securities exam prep with the Solomon Exam Prep app!

To download the app, please visit: goo.gl/IkNceh

Solomon Exam Prep has helped thousands of financial professionals pass their FINRA, NASAA, and MSRB licensing exams, including the Series 6, Series 7, Series 24, Series 26, Series 27, Series 28, Series 50, Series 51, Series 52, Series 53, Series 62, Series 63, Series 65, Series 66, Series 79, Series 82, and the Series 99.

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Treasury Reports Record-Low Yield on 10-Year Note

On Friday, July 8, the Treasury Department reported that the yield on the 10-year Treasury note was its lowest ever: 1.36%. This is astonishing given that this popular US government debt investment has been traded for 226 years (since 1790). Continue reading

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On Friday, July 8, the Treasury Department reported that the yield on the 10-year Treasury note was its lowest ever: 1.36%.  This is astonishing given that this popular US government debt investment has been traded for 226 years (since 1790).

Treasury notes and other government debt instruments are affected by supply and demand, inflation expectations, monetary policy, and the general state of the economy, among other factors.  This historic drop in Treasury yields has been driven by increased demand due to the global “flight to quality” after the Brexit vote, negative yields in Europe and Japan, a cautious Federal Reserve, and slow economic growth around the world.

For anyone studying for the Series 6, Series 7, Series 65, Series 66, Series 79, Series 62, or Series 82, it’s important to remember that bond prices and yields move in opposite directions. That’s why the relationship is often compared to a seesaw.  When the demand for bonds increases, bond prices go up, and yields go down. Conversely, when demand decreases, bond prices go down and yields go up. As demand has surged for Treasury notes and other US government debt, the yield on these notes has declined to record low levels.

Market Circuit Breakers — A Post-Brexit Reminder

With post-Brexit vote market turmoil, it’s good to remember that the Securities Exchange Commission requires trading halts across US markets in the event that stocks fall more than specified percentages in one day. Continue reading

stop-634941_1280With post-Brexit vote market turmoil, it’s good to remember that the Securities Exchange Commission requires trading halts across US markets in the event that stocks fall more than specified percentages in one day. This information is also important to know if you are studying for securities licensing exam such as the Series 7, Series 24, Series 26, Series 62, Series 79, and the Series 65.

A market-wide trading halt can be triggered at three thresholds. These thresholds are triggered by steep declines in the S&P 500 Index. They are calculated based on the prior day’s closing price of the Index.

• Level 1 Halt—a 7% drop in the S&P 500 prior to 3:25 p.m. ET will result in a 15-minute cross-market trading halt. There will be no halt if the drop occurs at or after 3:25 p.m. ET.

• Level 2 Halt—a 13% drop in the S&P 500 prior to 3:25 p.m. ET will result in a 15-minute cross-market trading halt. There will be no halt if the drop occurs at or after 3:25 p.m. ET.

• Level 3 Halt—a 20% drop in the S&P 500 at any time during the day will result in a cross-market trading halt for the remainder of the day.

These halts apply to securities and options trading on all the exchanges as well as the OTC market. Levels 1 and 2 trading halts are permitted just once a day.

Solomon Exam Prep has helped thousands of financial professionals pass the Series 6, 7, 63, 65, 66, 24, 26, 27, 50, 51, 52, 53, 62, 79, 82 and 99 exams.

For more information call 503 601 0212 or visit http://www.solomonexamprep.com/

Study Question of the Month – November

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Relevant to the Series 6, 7, 62, 65 and 79. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 6Series 7Series 62Series 65 and Series 79): A few years back ABC Corporation issued callable bonds yielding 6%. The call price is 104, and the call protection period has ended. The bonds are trading at 105 today. Which of the following are true:

I. The current yield on these bonds is 6.3%

II. The current yield on these bonds is 5.7%

III. There is a good chance the bonds will be called

IV. There is a good chance the bonds will not be called

Answers: 

A. I and III

B. I and IV

C. II and III

D. II and IV

Correct Answer: C. II and III

Rationale: The formula for calculating current yield is the annual interest on the bond ($60) divided by the current price of the bond ($1050) which is equal to 5.7%. Because ABC can finance the debt at a lower interest rate than they are currently paying there is a good chance that they will call the bonds.

Congratulations Stephen Z., this month’s Study Question of the Month winner!

All study questions are from Solomon’s industry-leading Online Exam Simulator.

FINRA Institutes Rule 2241, Replacing NASD Rule 2711 and NYSE Rule 472

On September 25, 2015, FINRA implemented a new rule regarding the relationship between investment banking personnel and research analysts. FINRA rule 2241 replaces NASD Rule 2711 and NYSE Rule 472. NASD Rule 2711 was created to prevent investment bankers from pressuring research analysts at the investment bank to write favorable research reports about securities that the investment bank was distributing or planning to distribute. Continue reading

Exam AlertOn September 25, 2015, FINRA implemented a new rule regarding the relationship between investment banking personnel and research analysts. FINRA rule 2241  replaces NASD Rule 2711 and NYSE Rule 472. NASD Rule 2711 was created to prevent investment bankers from pressuring research analysts at the investment bank to write favorable research reports about securities that the investment bank was distributing or planning to distribute.

The new rule is similar to the rules it replaces with a series of changes that will be implemented to further promote objective and reliable research.

The new rule requires member firms to establish, maintain and enforce written procedures regarding conflicts of interest between research analysts and other people within the firm (e.g., personnel from investment banking, trading and sales). The written policies and procedures should allow analysts to produce objective and reliable research that reflects their true opinions about the securities they are evaluating. The policies and procedures should prevent firms from using research to manipulate or condition the market.

Rule 2241 prevents investment banking personnel from reviewing research reports for factual accuracy before publication. This practice was allowed in the previous rule. Also, firms must specify in their policies and procedures if and when non-research personnel would be allowed to review a research report before publication. If such prepublication review by non-research personnel is permitted then a firm’s written policies and procedures must specify under what circumstances that would be necessary and appropriate. Under the new rule, a FINRA member firm’s written policies and procedures must prohibit pre-publication review of research reports by a subject company (i.e., an issuer) for purposes other than fact-checking.

The new rule says that firms must establish information barriers to ensure that research analysts are insulated from the review, pressure or oversight of other personnel, such as investment banking, sales, and trading. The rule also extends the prohibition on retaliation, preventing employees from retaliating against a research analyst for writing an unfavorable report.

Interestingly, the rule 2241 reduces the quiet periods for IPOs to 10 days for all underwriters and dealers involved in the IPO (it was formerly 40 days for managers and co-managers and 25 days for underwriters and dealers). The quiet period has been reduced to three days for managers or co-managers on follow-on offerings. During a quiet period, firms may not publish or distribute research reports about the issuer, and research analysts may not make public appearances about the issuer.

The new rule continues to prevent investment-banking personnel from supervising research analysts or exerting any influence over analysts’ compensation. In addition, research analysts may not participate in the solicitation of investment banking business. Moreover, research analysts may not communicate with a customer or prospective customer about an investment banking transaction in the presence of the firm’s management or investment banking department personnel. Similarly, investment-banking personnel are forbidden from directing a research analyst either to participate in soliciting investment-banking business or to communicate with a customer or prospective customer about an investment banking transaction.

Note: In 2012, the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act loosened constraints on research analysts for emerging growth companies (EGCs), defined as businesses with less than $1 billion in revenue. Specifically, the JOBS Act prohibits regulators from imposing a quiet period on EGCs. This means that research analysts from an underwriting firm that participated in an emerging growth company’s IPO may make both public appearances and distribute research reports during the quiet period. If the company is an emerging growth company, a research analyst may attend a pitch meeting, but not participate in soliciting investment-banking business.

Source: Regulatory Notice 15-30

This alert applies to the Series 7, Series 24, Series 79, and Series 82.

Exam Alert: SEC Raises Regulation A Limit, Creates Tiers

Effective June 19, 2015 the SEC changed the Regulation A registration exemption for small issues. The change moved from the old standard of $5 million or smaller issues to a new standard of $50 million or smaller issues. In addition, there are two “tiers” for Reg A – offerings up to $20 million are Tier 1, and offerings up to $50 million are Tier 2. Continue reading

Exam AlertEffective June 19, 2015 the SEC changed the Regulation A registration exemption for small issues. The change moved from the old standard of $5 million or smaller issues to a new standard of $50 million or smaller issues. In addition, there are two “tiers” for Reg A – offerings up to $20 million are Tier 1, and offerings up to $50 million are Tier 2.

Tier 2 issuers are required to include audited financial statements in their offering documents and to file annual, semiannual, and current reports with the SEC. Also, if a Tier 2 issue is not listed on a national securities exchange, purchasers in Tier 2 offerings must either be accredited investors or be subject to certain limitations on their investment. Specifically, non-accredited investors cannot spend over 10% of the greater their annual income or net worth for a natural person, or over 10% of the greater of their revenue or net assets for a non-natural person.

Sources:
Amendments to Regulation A (SEC document detailing the change)
Regulation A (current version of Regulation A)

This alert applies to the Series 7, Series 24, Series 62, Series 79, and Series 82.

Exam Alert: FINRA Revises Public, Non-public Arbitrator Standards

Effective June 26, 2015, FINRA will alter its rules regarding who will be consider a public or non-public arbitrator. The change will make it so that any arbitrator who has worked in the financial industry for any period of time will be considered a non-public arbitrator. Also, arbitrators who represent investors or the financial industry as a significant part of their business will be considered non-public arbitrators, but may become public arbitrators after a cooling-off period. Continue reading

Exam AlertEffective June 26, 2015, FINRA will alter its rules regarding who will be considered a public or non-public arbitrator. The change will make it so that any arbitrator who has worked in the financial industry for any period of time will be considered a non-public arbitrator. Also, arbitrators who represent investors or the financial industry as a significant part of their business will be considered non-public arbitrators, but may become public arbitrators after a cooling-off period. The cooling-off period lasts five years if they were disqualified from being a public arbitrator based on their own actions. The cooling-off period lasts two years if they were disqualified from being a public arbitrator based on someone else’s actions.

Source: SEC Approves Amendments to Arbitration Codes to Revise the Definitions of Non-Public and Public Arbitrator

This alert applies to the Series 6, Series 7, Series 24, Series 26, Series 27, Series 28, Series 62, Series 79, and Series 82.