Market Circuit Breakers — A Post-Brexit Reminder

With post-Brexit vote market turmoil, it’s good to remember that the Securities Exchange Commission requires trading halts across US markets in the event that stocks fall more than specified percentages in one day. Continue reading

stop-634941_1280With post-Brexit vote market turmoil, it’s good to remember that the Securities Exchange Commission requires trading halts across US markets in the event that stocks fall more than specified percentages in one day. This information is also important to know if you are studying for securities licensing exam such as the Series 7, Series 24, Series 26, Series 62, Series 79, and the Series 65.

A market-wide trading halt can be triggered at three thresholds. These thresholds are triggered by steep declines in the S&P 500 Index. They are calculated based on the prior day’s closing price of the Index.

• Level 1 Halt—a 7% drop in the S&P 500 prior to 3:25 p.m. ET will result in a 15-minute cross-market trading halt. There will be no halt if the drop occurs at or after 3:25 p.m. ET.

• Level 2 Halt—a 13% drop in the S&P 500 prior to 3:25 p.m. ET will result in a 15-minute cross-market trading halt. There will be no halt if the drop occurs at or after 3:25 p.m. ET.

• Level 3 Halt—a 20% drop in the S&P 500 at any time during the day will result in a cross-market trading halt for the remainder of the day.

These halts apply to securities and options trading on all the exchanges as well as the OTC market. Levels 1 and 2 trading halts are permitted just once a day.

Solomon Exam Prep has helped thousands of financial professionals pass the Series 6, 7, 63, 65, 66, 24, 26, 27, 50, 51, 52, 53, 62, 79, 82 and 99 exams.

For more information call 503 601 0212 or visit http://www.solomonexamprep.com/

Study Question of the Month – November

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Relevant to the Series 6, 7, 62, 65 and 79. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 6Series 7Series 62Series 65 and Series 79): A few years back ABC Corporation issued callable bonds yielding 6%. The call price is 104, and the call protection period has ended. The bonds are trading at 105 today. Which of the following are true:

I. The current yield on these bonds is 6.3%

II. The current yield on these bonds is 5.7%

III. There is a good chance the bonds will be called

IV. There is a good chance the bonds will not be called

Answers: 

A. I and III

B. I and IV

C. II and III

D. II and IV

Correct Answer: C. II and III

Rationale: The formula for calculating current yield is the annual interest on the bond ($60) divided by the current price of the bond ($1050) which is equal to 5.7%. Because ABC can finance the debt at a lower interest rate than they are currently paying there is a good chance that they will call the bonds.

Congratulations Stephen Z., this month’s Study Question of the Month winner!

All study questions are from Solomon’s industry-leading Online Exam Simulator.

FINRA Institutes Rule 2241, Replacing NASD Rule 2711 and NYSE Rule 472

On September 25, 2015, FINRA implemented a new rule regarding the relationship between investment banking personnel and research analysts. FINRA rule 2241 replaces NASD Rule 2711 and NYSE Rule 472. NASD Rule 2711 was created to prevent investment bankers from pressuring research analysts at the investment bank to write favorable research reports about securities that the investment bank was distributing or planning to distribute. Continue reading

Exam AlertOn September 25, 2015, FINRA implemented a new rule regarding the relationship between investment banking personnel and research analysts. FINRA rule 2241  replaces NASD Rule 2711 and NYSE Rule 472. NASD Rule 2711 was created to prevent investment bankers from pressuring research analysts at the investment bank to write favorable research reports about securities that the investment bank was distributing or planning to distribute.

The new rule is similar to the rules it replaces with a series of changes that will be implemented to further promote objective and reliable research.

The new rule requires member firms to establish, maintain and enforce written procedures regarding conflicts of interest between research analysts and other people within the firm (e.g., personnel from investment banking, trading and sales). The written policies and procedures should allow analysts to produce objective and reliable research that reflects their true opinions about the securities they are evaluating. The policies and procedures should prevent firms from using research to manipulate or condition the market.

Rule 2241 prevents investment banking personnel from reviewing research reports for factual accuracy before publication. This practice was allowed in the previous rule. Also, firms must specify in their policies and procedures if and when non-research personnel would be allowed to review a research report before publication. If such prepublication review by non-research personnel is permitted then a firm’s written policies and procedures must specify under what circumstances that would be necessary and appropriate. Under the new rule, a FINRA member firm’s written policies and procedures must prohibit pre-publication review of research reports by a subject company (i.e., an issuer) for purposes other than fact-checking.

The new rule says that firms must establish information barriers to ensure that research analysts are insulated from the review, pressure or oversight of other personnel, such as investment banking, sales, and trading. The rule also extends the prohibition on retaliation, preventing employees from retaliating against a research analyst for writing an unfavorable report.

Interestingly, the rule 2241 reduces the quiet periods for IPOs to 10 days for all underwriters and dealers involved in the IPO (it was formerly 40 days for managers and co-managers and 25 days for underwriters and dealers). The quiet period has been reduced to three days for managers or co-managers on follow-on offerings. During a quiet period, firms may not publish or distribute research reports about the issuer, and research analysts may not make public appearances about the issuer.

The new rule continues to prevent investment-banking personnel from supervising research analysts or exerting any influence over analysts’ compensation. In addition, research analysts may not participate in the solicitation of investment banking business. Moreover, research analysts may not communicate with a customer or prospective customer about an investment banking transaction in the presence of the firm’s management or investment banking department personnel. Similarly, investment-banking personnel are forbidden from directing a research analyst either to participate in soliciting investment-banking business or to communicate with a customer or prospective customer about an investment banking transaction.

Note: In 2012, the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act loosened constraints on research analysts for emerging growth companies (EGCs), defined as businesses with less than $1 billion in revenue. Specifically, the JOBS Act prohibits regulators from imposing a quiet period on EGCs. This means that research analysts from an underwriting firm that participated in an emerging growth company’s IPO may make both public appearances and distribute research reports during the quiet period. If the company is an emerging growth company, a research analyst may attend a pitch meeting, but not participate in soliciting investment-banking business.

Source: Regulatory Notice 15-30

This alert applies to the Series 7, Series 24, Series 79, and Series 82.

Exam Alert: FINRA Revises Public, Non-public Arbitrator Standards

Effective June 26, 2015, FINRA will alter its rules regarding who will be consider a public or non-public arbitrator. The change will make it so that any arbitrator who has worked in the financial industry for any period of time will be considered a non-public arbitrator. Also, arbitrators who represent investors or the financial industry as a significant part of their business will be considered non-public arbitrators, but may become public arbitrators after a cooling-off period. Continue reading

Exam AlertEffective June 26, 2015, FINRA will alter its rules regarding who will be considered a public or non-public arbitrator. The change will make it so that any arbitrator who has worked in the financial industry for any period of time will be considered a non-public arbitrator. Also, arbitrators who represent investors or the financial industry as a significant part of their business will be considered non-public arbitrators, but may become public arbitrators after a cooling-off period. The cooling-off period lasts five years if they were disqualified from being a public arbitrator based on their own actions. The cooling-off period lasts two years if they were disqualified from being a public arbitrator based on someone else’s actions.

Source: SEC Approves Amendments to Arbitration Codes to Revise the Definitions of Non-Public and Public Arbitrator

This alert applies to the Series 6, Series 7, Series 24, Series 26, Series 27, Series 28, Series 62, Series 79, and Series 82.

Study Question of the Month – March

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Relevant to the Series 7, 24, 27, 62, 79, 82, and 99. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 7, Series 24, Series 27, Series 62, Series 79, Series 82, and Series 99):

Jenny is an employee of a broker-dealer. She is a receptionist at the firm and is not a registered representative. She would like to purchase shares in an IPO that she has recently heard about at her office. Which of the following BEST describes her participation?

Answers:

A. Jenny may purchase shares of the IPO on the same basis as other customers.

B. Jenny is prohibited from purchasing shares of the IPO, but her spouse who she supports may purchase shares on the same basis as other customers.

C. Jenny may purchase shares of the IPO as long as the purchase quantity doesn’t exceed 200 shares.

D. Jenny is prohibited from purchasing shares of the IPO.

Correct Answer: D. Jenny is prohibited from purchasing shares of the IPO.

Rationale: FINRA Rule 5130 – Restrictions on the Purchase and Sale of Initial Equity Public Offerings – prohibits a member firm (broker/dealer) from selling shares of an IPO to an account in which a “restricted person“ has a beneficial interest, subject to certain limited exceptions. All employees of a broker-dealer are considered “restricted persons“ under the rule.

Congratulations! This month’s winner is Alexandra K.

Weekly study questions are from Solomon’s industry-leading Online Exam Simulator.

Study Question of the Month – January

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Submit your answer for a chance to win a $10 Starbucks gift card! Relevant to the Series 7, 24, 26, 27, 51, 52, 53, 62, 79, 82, 99. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

 Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 7Series 24, Series 26, Series 27, Series 51, Series 52, Series 53Series 62Series 79, Series 82, Series 99) 

Jon and Jenny are married. They each have an individual account and they have a joint account owned by both of them. What is the combined maximum SIPC coverage for all their accounts?

Answers:

A. $500,000

B. $1,000,000

C. $1,500,000

D. $750,000

Correct Answer: C. $1,500,000

Rationale: SIPC covers a maximum of $500,000 per “separate customer” at a broker-dealer or clearing firm including up to $250,000 in cash.Total coverage can be higher for multiple accounts if the accounts are considered to be held by separate customers. There are five categories of separate customers defined by SIPC. These categories include 1) individual accounts, 2) joint accounts, 3) accounts held by executors, administrators, and guardians/custodians/conservators (such as UGMA accounts), 4) accounts held by corporations, partnerships, or unincorporated associations, and 5) trust accounts. Thus, two individual accounts held by two different people, and one joint account would be considered three separate customers by the SIPC, and therefore subject to a maximum of $1,500,000 of coverage.

Congratulations! This month’s winner is Abe B.

Weekly study questions are from Solomon’s industry-leading Online Exam Simulator.

Study Question of the Month – November

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Relevant to the Series 6, 7, 62, 79, and 82. –ANSWER POSTED– Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

 Study Question

Question (Relevant to the Series 6Series 7Series 62, Series 79 and Series 82): 

As the price of the underlying stock of a convertible debenture goes up:

I. The parity value of the bond increases.
II. The current yield of the bond goes up.
III. The parity value of the bond decreases.
IV. The current yield of the bond goes down.

Answers:

A. I and III

B. III and IV

C. II and III

D. I and IV

Correct Answer: D. I and IV

Rationale: With a fixed conversion schedule, the parity value of the bond increases along with the price of the underlying stock. Since the nominal yield of the bond is fixed, the current yield, expressed as a percent of the bond’s price, goes down.

Weekly study questions are from Solomon’s industry-leading Online Exam Simulator.

Testimonial Tuesday: October 21, 2014 Edition

“I’ve been using Solomon Exam Preparation materials for my last four Series tests: the Series 82, Series 63, Series 79 and just recently the Series 7. My scores on these tests were 88, 90, 88 and 90…” Continue reading

“I’ve been using Solomon Exam Preparation materials for my last four Series tests: the Series 82, Series 63, Series 79 and just recently the Series 7.  My scores on these tests were 88, 90, 88 and 90.  The Solomon texts were comprehensive and easy to read; everything you need to know is in there.  But there is so much material that these exams cover that you have to read the texts several times over and take as many practice quizzes and tests as you can until you score in the mid 80’s.  Then go in for the test.  That’s what I did.  I went in scoring in the mid 80’s on practice exams and “peaked” at higher scores while taking the actual tests.  You can’t do any better than Solomon.  I highly recommend them.”

-Michael McGregor, FOCUS Investment Banking, Charlotte, NC

 

Read more reviews here: Solomon Exam Prep Reviews

Testimonial Tuesday: September 9, 2014 Edition

“I passed the Series 79 (on my first attempt) with help from Solomon Exam Prep….” Continue reading

“I passed the Series 79 (on my first attempt) with help from Solomon Exam Prep. I found the study book and online exams to be quite helpful, and would recommend Solomon as a study resource for anyone.”

– Joseph H., Denver, CO

Read more reviews here: Solomon Exam Prep Reviews