October Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the Series 7Series 62, Series 65Series 79, Series 82, and Series 99.

 

 

 

 

 

What is the holding period for restricted securities issued by a company that files reports with the SEC?
 
A. Six months
B. Nine months
C. Twelve months

D. Securities issued by a company that files with the SEC are never restricted

Answer: A. Rule 144 requires purchasers of restricted securities to hold them for a certain amount of time before they sell them. If the issuer is a company that files reports with the SEC, the holding period is six months. If the issuer is a non-reporting company, the holding period is 12 months.

September Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the Series 62, Series 79, and Series 82.

 

 

 

 

 

Which of the following is an advantage of a 506(b) offering?
 
A. Sold shares are not restricted
B. It may be advertised to the public because it is considered a public offering
C. Instead of a prospectus, it may use a briefer document called an offering circular

D. It has no dollar limit

Answer: D. A private placement offering under Regulation D, Rule 506(b) has no dollar limit. The other three responses are advantages of Regulation A offerings.

August Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the Series 6Series 7, Series 24, Series 26Series 62, Series 79Series 82, and Series 99.

 

 

 

 

 

Which of these records about your customer Doug is your firm required to retain for five years?
 
A. Doug’s customer ledger
B. A SAR you filed on Doug
C. A complaint Doug filed about you

D. A confirmation of one of Doug’s trades

Answer: B. The general tier of recordkeeping is three years, six years, and lifetime, although there are some records with retention periods of four or five years. Additionally, the firm must keep most records easily accessible for the first two years.

Customer ledgers fall in the six-year tier, Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) fall in the five-year tier, customer complaints fall in the four-year tier, and trade confirmations fall in the three-year tier.

July Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the Series 6Series 7Series 62Series 65,  Series 66,  Series 82, and Series 99.

 

 

 

 

 

Bob owns convertible preferred stock in BigCo. Which of the following is a taxable event for Bob?
 
A. He converts it into common stock
B. Due to a corporate restructuring, he receives additional shares
C. He receives a cash dividend that is less than the amount that the share price declined last quarter

D. Due to a corporate merger, his shares are exchanged for shares in LargerCo

Answer: C. Receiving a dividend (even a qualified dividend) is a taxable event. When a company merges with another company, it may give its shareholders stock in a new company in exchange for the stock they currently hold. This is usually not a taxable event, meaning the shareholder does not have to pay taxes on the new shares at the time of the exchange. Moreover, if the company gives shares of common or preferred stock to shareholders because of a corporate restructuring or bankruptcy, this is also not a taxable event. Additionally, the conversion of convertible preferred stock (or bonds) to common stock is not a taxable event.

Time is of the essence for anyone who wants to take the Series 82 exam

Alert! Starting October 1, the number of exam questions for the Series 82 Private Securities Offerings Representative licensing category will increase from 100 questions to 125 questions. Continue reading

Alert! Starting October 1, the number of exam questions for the Series 82 Private Securities Offerings Representative licensing category will increase from 100 questions to 125 questions. That’s because starting October 1, the Series 82 exam, like all FINRA representative level exams, is being divided into two exams: the SIE (75 questions) and the Series 82 “top-off” (50 questions). More work!

But if you don’t want to take 25 additional questions, not to mention take two exams instead of one, then Solomon Exam Prep recommends you take your Series 82 exam pronto, before October 1.

Series 82 students will also be happy to know that Solomon Exam Prep has just updated its Series 82 Video Lecture with updates about Regulation D, Rule 147, and research report rules.  The Solomon Exam Prep Video Lecture is a critical piece of the Solomon Securities Exam Prep system that also includes the Exam Guide, the Audio Guide and the Exam Simulator.

Spring is in the air and there has never been a better time to take the Series 82! 

November Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Congratulations to Elizabeth S., this month’s Study Question of the Month winner!

Question

Relevant to the SIESeries 7, Series 24, Series 79, and Series 82.

 

 

 

 

 

Which of the following would not necessarily be restricted shares when you purchase them?:

A. Shares sold by the CEO of the issuing company

B. Shares sold by the CEO’s wife of the issuing company

C. Shares sold by the assistant to the CEO of the issuing company

D. Shares sold by a major shareholder (more than 10% ownership) of the issuing company

Answer: C.

Securities that are held by control persons are called control securities. A control person, or affiliated person, is an individual in a position to exert direct influence on the actions of an issuer. For example, officers, directors, policy-making executives, major shareholders (generally own 10% or more of outstanding shares), and other people who are in a position to directly or indirectly control the management of the company are considered control persons. This includes spouses, family members who live with them, and other entities such as trusts or corporations affiliated with control persons, as defined in Rule 144. When control securities are sold, they become restricted securities even if they were not restricted securities previously.

April Study Question of the Month

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.*** Continue reading

Congratulations to Margaret C., this month’s Study Question of the Month winner! 

See the answer below!

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

Question (Relevant to the Series 6, Series 7, Series 62, Series 65, Series 66, Series 82)

To qualify as a long-term capital gain or loss, stock must be held for more than one year. At purchase, the holding period clock begins:

A. On the trade date
B. One day after the trade date
C. On the settlement date
D. One day after the settlement date

Answer: B. According to the IRS, the holding period clock begins the day after the shares were purchased.

It’s Settled: SEC Shortens Regular-Way to T+2

If you’ve ever traded securities or studied for a securities licensing exam, then you’ve probably come across T+3. No, it’s not an herbal supplement or an embarrassing medical procedure. Continue reading

If you’ve ever traded securities or studied for a securities licensing exam, then you’ve probably come across T+3. No, it’s not an herbal supplement or an embarrassing medical procedure. T+3 refers to the regular-way settlement period for most securities transactions. This means that securities must be paid for and delivered by three business days from the trade date. T+3 also means you don’t become the owner of record of a security until three business days after you purchase it.

Well, add T+3 to the list of things that have gone out of style. Effective May 30, 2017, the SEC will shorten the regular-way settlement period to two business days. And so will begin the age of T+2, which is intended to “increase efficiency and reduce risk for market participants,” according to SEC Acting Chairman Michael Pinowar.

This shorter settlement period for the trading of secondary market securities has been discussed by the SEC for years. The change is expected to lower margin requirements for clearing agency members, reduce liquidity stress when markets are volatile, and harmonize settlement with European markets, which moved to T+2 in 2014.

This settlement period will not apply to every securities transaction, though. T+2, like T+3 before it, will apply to:

  • Stocks
  • Bonds
  • Municipal securities
  • Exchange-traded funds
  • Mutual funds traded through a brokerage firm
  • Unit investment trusts
  • Limited partnerships that trade on an exchange

The securities industry moves fast. Don’t get left behind! Visit www.solomonexamprep.com or call us at 503-601-0212 for more information about the latest securities exam preparation and education.

Solomon has helped thousands pass their Series 6, Series 7, Series 24, Series 26, Series 27, Series 28, Series 50, Series 51, Series 52, Series 53, Series 62, Series 63, Series 65, Series 66, Series 79, Series 82, and Series 99.

Study Question of the Month – October 2016

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available! Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available!

***Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.***

studyQuestion

Question (Relevant to the Series 6, Series 7Series 24Series 26Series 27, Series 51, Series 52, Series 53, and Series 82):

Which of the following claims would be covered by SIPC?

A. Claims of officers or partners of the failed firm

B. Claims involving nontransferable assets

C. Claims of subordinated lenders

D. Claims of persons who own more than 5% of the failed firm

Answer: B. SIPC only covers losses due to firm bankruptcy. It does not cover market losses. Nontransferable assets, such as proprietary funds and bonds in default, are covered as long as they are within the $500,000 limit for the account.

Additionally, the following claims are excluded from SIPC coverage:

  • Claims of officers or partners of the failed firm
  • Claims of persons who own more than 5% of the failed firm
  • Claims of subordinated lenders