Series 82 Top-off Flashcards

Learn key definitions and concepts on the FINRA Limited Representative-Private Securities Offerings Qualification Exam with Solomon Exam Prep Series 82 Top-off exam digital flashcards! Continue reading

Learn key definitions and concepts on the FINRA Limited Representative-Private Securities Offerings Qualification Exam with Solomon Exam Prep Series 82 Top-off exam digital flashcards! The perfect supplement to Solomon’s  industry-leading Series 82 study materials, the Solomon Series 82 flashcard pack will help you learn industry definitions and concepts with ease.

  • Over 300 digital cards featuring clear, easy to understand definitions
  • Rating feature allows user to customize deck for targeted learning
  • Turn on text-to-speech and listen while you learn
  • Available on Solomon Exam Prep apps for on-the-go learning
  • Individual price: $29.95

Or, buy a Solomon Series 82 Top-off Study Package … and get the Solomon Series 82 Top-off Flashcards for free!

April Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $20 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $20 Starbucks gift card.

Question

 

 

 

 

 

 

When inherited, the basis of a depreciated asset is?
 
A. Stepped up
B. Stepped down
C. Carried over
D. Carried under
 
Answer: B. Typically, when an asset is inherited, the value of the asset has increased since it was purchased and the heir gets to “step up” (raise) the basis of the inherited property to the fair market value at the date of death. So, for example, if Grandpa bought shares of XYZ  for $1,000 in the previous century, and the shares are worth $1 million on the date of Grandpa’s death, the basis for tax purposes is stepped up to $1 million to the lucky recipient. This means that capital gain escapes any federal taxation. 
The basis “step-up” rule can become a “step-down” rule as well. So if an asset’s value has declined and someone inherits the asset, for the sake of taxes, the basis of the asset is stepped down (lowered) to the fair market value on the date of the owner’s death. This loss of basis can be avoided by the owner selling any depreciated property before death, so he or she can reap the tax losses.

October Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the Series 7Series 62, Series 65Series 79, Series 82, and Series 99.

 

 

 

 

 

What is the holding period for restricted securities issued by a company that files reports with the SEC?
 
A. Six months
B. Nine months
C. Twelve months

D. Securities issued by a company that files with the SEC are never restricted

Answer: A. Rule 144 requires purchasers of restricted securities to hold them for a certain amount of time before they sell them. If the issuer is a company that files reports with the SEC, the holding period is six months. If the issuer is a non-reporting company, the holding period is 12 months.

September Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the Series 62, Series 79, and Series 82.

 

 

 

 

 

Which of the following is an advantage of a 506(b) offering?
 
A. Sold shares are not restricted
B. It may be advertised to the public because it is considered a public offering
C. Instead of a prospectus, it may use a briefer document called an offering circular

D. It has no dollar limit

Answer: D. A private placement offering under Regulation D, Rule 506(b) has no dollar limit. The other three responses are advantages of Regulation A offerings.

August Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the Series 6Series 7, Series 24, Series 26Series 62, Series 79Series 82, and Series 99.

 

 

 

 

 

Which of these records about your customer Doug is your firm required to retain for five years?
 
A. Doug’s customer ledger
B. A SAR you filed on Doug
C. A complaint Doug filed about you

D. A confirmation of one of Doug’s trades

Answer: B. The general tier of recordkeeping is three years, six years, and lifetime, although there are some records with retention periods of four or five years. Additionally, the firm must keep most records easily accessible for the first two years.

Customer ledgers fall in the six-year tier, Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) fall in the five-year tier, customer complaints fall in the four-year tier, and trade confirmations fall in the three-year tier.

July Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Question

Relevant to the Series 6Series 7Series 62Series 65,  Series 66,  Series 82, and Series 99.

 

 

 

 

 

Bob owns convertible preferred stock in BigCo. Which of the following is a taxable event for Bob?
 
A. He converts it into common stock
B. Due to a corporate restructuring, he receives additional shares
C. He receives a cash dividend that is less than the amount that the share price declined last quarter

D. Due to a corporate merger, his shares are exchanged for shares in LargerCo

Answer: C. Receiving a dividend (even a qualified dividend) is a taxable event. When a company merges with another company, it may give its shareholders stock in a new company in exchange for the stock they currently hold. This is usually not a taxable event, meaning the shareholder does not have to pay taxes on the new shares at the time of the exchange. Moreover, if the company gives shares of common or preferred stock to shareholders because of a corporate restructuring or bankruptcy, this is also not a taxable event. Additionally, the conversion of convertible preferred stock (or bonds) to common stock is not a taxable event.

Time is of the essence for anyone who wants to take the Series 82 exam

Alert! Starting October 1, the number of exam questions for the Series 82 Private Securities Offerings Representative licensing category will increase from 100 questions to 125 questions. Continue reading

Alert! Starting October 1, the number of exam questions for the Series 82 Private Securities Offerings Representative licensing category will increase from 100 questions to 125 questions. That’s because starting October 1, the Series 82 exam, like all FINRA representative level exams, is being divided into two exams: the SIE (75 questions) and the Series 82 “top-off” (50 questions). More work!

But if you don’t want to take 25 additional questions, not to mention take two exams instead of one, then Solomon Exam Prep recommends you take your Series 82 exam pronto, before October 1.

Series 82 students will also be happy to know that Solomon Exam Prep has just updated its Series 82 Video Lecture with updates about Regulation D, Rule 147, and research report rules.  The Solomon Exam Prep Video Lecture is a critical piece of the Solomon Securities Exam Prep system that also includes the Exam Guide, the Audio Guide and the Exam Simulator.

Spring is in the air and there has never been a better time to take the Series 82! 

November Study Question of the Month

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card. Continue reading

Submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $10 Starbucks gift card.

Congratulations to Elizabeth S., this month’s Study Question of the Month winner!

Question

Relevant to the SIESeries 7, Series 24, Series 79, and Series 82.

 

 

 

 

 

Which of the following would not necessarily be restricted shares when you purchase them?:

A. Shares sold by the CEO of the issuing company

B. Shares sold by the CEO’s wife of the issuing company

C. Shares sold by the assistant to the CEO of the issuing company

D. Shares sold by a major shareholder (more than 10% ownership) of the issuing company

Answer: C.

Securities that are held by control persons are called control securities. A control person, or affiliated person, is an individual in a position to exert direct influence on the actions of an issuer. For example, officers, directors, policy-making executives, major shareholders (generally own 10% or more of outstanding shares), and other people who are in a position to directly or indirectly control the management of the company are considered control persons. This includes spouses, family members who live with them, and other entities such as trusts or corporations affiliated with control persons, as defined in Rule 144. When control securities are sold, they become restricted securities even if they were not restricted securities previously.