Solomon Exam Prep SIE Practice Exam Now Available!

Meet the newest addition to Solomon Exam Prep’s lineup of free Sample Quizzes: the SIE Sample Exam! Visit the Solomon website to try it out. Continue reading

Meet the newest addition to Solomon Exam Prep’s lineup of free Sample Quizzes: the SIE Sample Exam! Like all Solomon Sample Quizzes, the SIE Sample Exam features questions from our industry-leading Online Exam Simulator. Questions are written by Solomon content experts, who are experienced in both investment education and the process of adult learning. 

But unlike other Solomon Sample Quizzes, the SIE Sample Exam is a FULL exam – it contains 75 questions, just like the real FINRA SIE exam – giving you an even better idea of what the actual exam is like. You will encounter easy, medium, and difficult questions so that you can more easily gauge your current knowledge of SIE content. 

All Solomon Sample Quizzes and Exams also provide instant feedback for each answer, with a full rationale to help you understand the WHY behind the what. Plus, you get a report at the end detailing your results and giving you the opportunity to review all the questions. 

Visit the Solomon website here to try out the SIE Sample Exam and explore free samples of quizzes for 21 different exams.

Broker-Dealer vs. Investment Adviser: What’s the Difference?

Do your customers know the difference between an IA and BD? Do you know the importance of this distinction and how it may affect your registration status? Continue reading

Do your customers know the difference between an investment adviser and broker-dealer? Do you know the importance of this distinction and how it may affect your registration status? 

Investment Adviser or Broker-Dealer at work.

For many retail customers, the difference between an investment adviser (IA) and a broker-dealer (BD) may not seem important. A customer may have received an investment recommendation from a BD, or owned securities through an IA account. However, which kind of firm you work for is important for knowing which services you may provide, how you may provide them, and which qualification exams you must pass.

Investment Advisers

Investment advisers are usually firms, though they can be an individual operating as a sole proprietor, whose primary business is providing investment advice, and who are paid for the advice itself. Investment adviser representatives (IARs) are individuals who work for IAs and advise the IA’s clients on the IA’s behalf. IAs and IARs are not “stockbrokers” and cannot directly buy or sell securities for their customers. While many have IA accounts through which they own stocks, mutual funds, and other securities, in fact these are accounts an IA opens on the customer’s behalf with a BD. 

Broker-Dealers

Broker-dealers are usually firms, though they can be an individual operating as a sole proprietor, that execute securities transactions for customers. An individual who is employed by a BD to handle customer accounts is called an “agent of a broker-dealer” on some exams, or a “registered representative” (RR) on others. BDs can offer investment advice incidental to their work with customers but cannot be compensated for the advice itself. If a BD acts as an intermediary between a buyer and a seller, then the BD can charge a commission on the trade. If a BDs buys or sells from its own inventory, then the BD makes money by charging a markup on securities that they sell and taking a markdown on securities that they buy.

So, if you’re an IAR, you… 
  • …can provide advice
  • …can be paid for that advice
  • …cannot execute trades
  • …cannot charge commissions or markups on your customer’s trades
If you’re a BD agent (also known as a registered representative), you…
  • …can provide advice
  • …cannot be paid for that advice
  • …can execute trades
  • …can charge commissions or markups on your customer’s trades

Testing and Licensing

Finally, many firms, especially larger ones, maintain both IA and BD registrations. When working for these “dual registrants,” you may be asked to qualify as an IAR, BD agent, or both, depending on your role.

In fact, an increase in dual registrations is one of the note-worthy trends Solomon discusses in our recent white paper, “Optimizing On-Boarding in 2021: 7 Key Trends for the Securities Industry,” available for download from this blog post

To become an agent of a broker-dealer (registered representative), you must pass the Securities Industry Essentials (SIE), and a “top-off” exam such as the Series 6 or Series 7, and for state registration usually the Series 63. To become an IAR, you must pass either the Series 65, or, if you work for a dually registered firm, the SIE, the Series 7, and the Series 66.

March Study Question of the Month

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Comment below or submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $20 Starbucks gift card.***

This question is relevant to the Series 14, 79, 82, and SIE exams.

Question:

A research analyst who works for an underwriter that participated in an IPO may not publicly discuss or write a research report about the company until __________________.

Answer Choices:

A. 30 days after the registration is filed 

B. 20 days after the securities are issued

C. 10 days after the date of the IPO

D. 30 days after the date of the IPO

Correct Answer: C – 10 days after the date of the IPO

Explanation: A research analyst who works for an underwriter of an IPO must not discuss or write a research report about the company for 10 days after the IPO.  This 10-day period of silence is called a ‘quiet period.’ There is no quiet period for EGCs (emerging growth companies). 


To explore free samples of Solomon Exam Prep’s industry-leading online exam simulators for the SIE, Series 14, Series 79, Series 82, and many more exams, visit the Solomon website here.

How I Passed the SIE Exam

Read our interview with Dominic Mamrega, a finance major at High Point University, who passed the SIE exam with Solomon’s self-study program. Continue reading

Dominic Mamrega, a senior at High Point University, passed the FINRA Securities Industry Essentials exam!

Dominic Mamrega is a finance major at High Point University in High Point, North Carolina. Dominic studied for the Securities Industry Essentials (SIE) exam in a self-study program using Solomon Exam Prep SIE materials. We interviewed Dominic after he passed the exam.

Solomon Exam Prep: Why did you decide to study finance and what is your dream job?

Dominic: I decided to study finance because growing up as a triplet my parents taught me the value of a dollar and how to properly save your money. It wasn’t easy for my parents, they had to buy three of everything. My father is great with numbers and taught me how to properly manage my money. My dream job has always been as a financial advisor/planner. There are many people who need financial help and I wanted to make a change.

Solomon Exam Prep: Why did you decide to take the SIE exam?

Dominic: I decided to take my SIE for two reasons. The first reason was I wanted to have an edge when applying to jobs and get ahead of the pack. The other reason I decided to take the SIE was I have a good friend who recently graduated HPU who is also in the field of finance and told me to get the ball rolling in order to land a job when I graduate in May 2021.

Solomon Exam Prep: Where do you work now and how did you get there?

Dominic: My current job is on campus working in the IT department which isn’t that exciting, and I got there by applying to every job on campus and waiting to hear back from one. My upcoming job when I graduate will be with Allied Wealth Partners as a Financial Advisor. I got there by looking at LinkedIn daily for job postings and applying to every single one. I went through the interview process with a few firms and had a great connection with Allied.

Solomon Exam Prep: How has the SIE helped you in your current job?

Dominic: The SIE has helped me land my current job because it showed Allied that I am eager and want to go in the field as fast as I can.

“Yes, I would recommend the Solomon SIE course to other students because you are still able to handle the studying time while staying on top of your classwork.”

Solomon Exam Prep: How did you find Solomon Exam Prep? 

Dominic: I chose Solomon when Professor James mentioned it to me in class one day. After I investigated it and when HPU had a discount code it was a no-brainer.

Solomon Exam Prep: What do you like about Solomon Exam Prep?

Dominic: There are many things I like about Solomon. The first one being the app that is for the phone and knowing I can study anywhere and anytime with ease. Throughout the day I will just take a quiz or read up on something. I like how the material is broken down with simple day-to-day tasks that do not overwhelm me. The ability to ask the professor and the quick response times you have. Finally, I enjoy the exam breakdowns and telling me where I should study more.

Solomon Exam Prep: What did you like about the Solomon Exam Prep SIE products?

Dominic: I enjoyed the website and how easy it is to navigate and go back to sections that I was struggling with. I enjoy the highlight feature that saves to a doc that I can print out and study from.

Solomon Exam Prep: Would you recommend the Solomon SIE course to other students? If yes, why?

Dominic: Yes, I would recommend the Solomon SIE course to other students because you are still able to handle the studying time while staying on top of your classwork.

Solomon Exam Prep: What other exams do you plan to take with Solomon?

Dominic: I am currently studying for Series 7 with Solomon and I will be taking that exam in late March. After that, I will be taking Series 66 with Solomon, and if all goes to plan that will be on June 1st.


For more information about Solomon Exam Prep’s compelling SIE program and the advantages for your students, contact Beth Hamilton at Beth@SolomonExamPrep.com or call 503-601-0212.

You can also learn more on the Solomon website Colleges page.

SEC Announces Major Revisions to Registration Exemptions Aimed at “Harmonizing” Regulation A Offerings, Regulation D Private Placements, and Crowdfunding

On November 2, the SEC announced a collection of rule changes meant to, in the announcement’s words, “harmonize, simplify, and improve” its “overly complex exempt offering framework.” Continue reading

On November 2, the SEC announced a collection of rule changes meant to, in the announcement’s words, “harmonize, simplify, and improve” its “overly complex exempt offering framework.” The changes affect Regulation A, which governs small public offerings; Regulation D, which governs private placements; and Regulation CF, which governs crowdfunding. This system of exemptions allows various small offerings to avoid the normal registration process required by the Securities Act.  
 
The rule changes should provide a clearer choice as to which exemption is most appropriate to an issuer, based on how much the issuer needs to raise and other factors.
 
The changes also seek to clarify how issuers can avoid “integration” of exempt offerings. Integration is the risk that exempt offerings will be considered a single offering by the SEC, because the offerings are too similar.
 
Highlights of the changes include:
 
  • If two exempt offerings are conducted more than 30 days apart, they are almost always protected from integration.
  • An issuer can “test the waters” with potential investors before deciding which exemption it will use for an offering. Test-the-waters communications solicit interest in a potential offering before the issuer has filed anything with the SEC. Previously, an issuer could only test the waters after deciding that its potential offering would take place under Regulation A.
  • Caps on the amount that may be raised through these exemptions have been increased:
    • Crowdfunding: from $1.07 million to $5 million
    • Regulation A, Tier 2: from $50 million to $75 million 
    • Regulation D, Rule 504: from $5 million to $10 million
  • Make “bad actor” exclusions more consistent across different exemptions.
The rule changes will take effect early next year. Until the changes take effect, securities exam questions will continue to be based on the old rules. FINRA Exams affected by these rule changes include the SIE, Series 6, Series 7, Series 14, Series 22, Series 24, Series 65, Series 66, Series 79, and Series 82.

November Study Question of the Month

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available. Continue reading

This month’s study question from the Solomon Online Exam Simulator question database is now available.

***Comment below or submit your answer to info@solomonexamprep.com to be entered to win a $20 Starbucks gift card.***

This question is relevant for the SIE and Series 7, 14, 24, 26, 27, 28, 51, 53, 65, 66, and 99 exams.

Question:

Which situation would a CTR need to be filed?

Answer Choices:

A. When a customer regularly, but on different days, deposits $9,900 into their account in cash.

B. When a person deposits checks for $11,000 every week.

C. A customer withdraws $10,500 from their account in cash.

D. A customer makes a $20,000 Venmo transaction.

Correct Answer: C

Explanation: A currency transaction report (CTR) is filed with FinCEN on cash transactions that exceed $10,000 in a single day, whether conducted in one transaction or several smaller ones. The transactions can be either deposits or withdrawals and they must be in cold, hard cash.

Solomon partners with Claflin University & Lincoln Financial Advisors to offer SIE class

Solomon Exam Prep is delighted to announce a partnership with Claflin University and Lincoln Financial Advisors. Continue reading

Solomon Exam Prep is delighted to announce a partnership with Claflin University and Lincoln Financial Advisors. With sponsorship from Lincoln Financial, Claflin University students taking a new Claflin investment course will receive the Solomon study materials they need to pass the FINRA Securities Industry Essentials (SIE) exam.
 
To read the official press release, please click on the download link below.

Know What to Expect: Testing Online with ProProctor from Prometric

FINRA partner Prometric has developed ProProctor for online, remote test taking. Here are some takeaways about the process. Continue reading

Lucas Rumpeltes of Solomon Exam Prep passed the SIE Exam with ProProctor

In person licensing exams have been a staple in the securities industry for decades, but with the novel Coronavirus COVID-19, FINRA has been tasked with providing a safer method for testing. Given this, FINRA partner Prometric has developed a new product titled ProProctor for online, remote test taking. Prometric is a giant in the testing industry, and operates hundreds of testing centers.

With all this as the backdrop, one month ago I was tasked with studying for and taking the SIE as a junior associate at Solomon Exam Prep. Using the ProProctor product seemed like the most convenient way to take the exam, and proved easy enough. However, for the benefit of Solomon exam takers, I would like to share some takeaways about the process.

I registered for the test three weeks ahead of time on the Prometric website, and there were still many time slots available, but the most convenient ones had been taken. The most feasible slot for me ended up being at 7:45 AM, so if you prefer to test later in the day, register ahead of time!

I immediately received a confirmation email detailing all of the procedures that I would need to follow for test day. It was a lengthy email. This is due to Prometric’s desire to avoid cheating and duplication of the test, so they are rightfully cautious. The full procedures can be found in this PDF. That being said, there are a few procedures that are very important to understand ahead of time. First is your testing environment. Ideally one is able to test in a bare, white room, at a desk, with no decorations of any kind. However, this is not always possible, so it is helpful to have a bed sheet or tarp on hand to cover anything that your proctor determines to be unacceptable. Furthermore, you cannot have any interruptions during the test, so it is imperative to notify your office mates! Prometric also recommends having a mirror on hand for the check in process. Ultimately, this is simply for the purpose of inspecting your laptop keyboard/screen if you cannot remove your webcam, so a medium sized mirror is fine. The more easily you can position it in front of your screen the better (I did not take my own advice here and had a giant mirror, which was tough to position so that my proctor could see my keyboard).

Leading up to the exam day, you should do one of Prometric’s system readiness checks, test your microphone specifically, and download/install their application. On exam day, you will be asked to follow a unique web link that is in your confirmation email to launch your exam. Once there, you will input user specific information, and it will automatically launch the application. Be warned, once you launch the exam application, you cannot access any other settings or applications on your computer, so adjust your volume or microphone controls ahead of time. Once there, you will be asked to photograph yourself, take a picture of your photo ID, and you will be sent to the security proctor.

Ultimately two different proctors will communicate with you. The process for meeting with them is seamless, and they will answer any questions you may have. The first will conduct the security checks and you will have a webcam view of them. The security checks are detailed on the ProProctor website, as well as in the confirmation email, but here are a few tips. I wore pants with lots of pockets, which was a mistake. Wearing as few items of clothing as possible, with as few pockets as possible, is helpful because they will ask you to empty them. Additionally, they advise no jewelry. Ideally, the only things in the testing room are you, your photo ID, and your computer. There is nothing else allowed (with the exception of tests that have certified testing materials).

The security checks also include room checks, which necessitates either an external webcam or an easily portable laptop. The fewer furniture items in the room, the easier the check will be. Finally, the security proctor will detail their break policy. I did not use the break, and it should ultimately be seen as an emergency asset. The test time does not stop while you take it, and you will have to redo all security checks upon returning.

Once all of the security protocol is over with, your security proctor will pass you on to another proctor. The new proctor will greet you via the application chat, but you will not see them on screen. They will, however, see your video and hear your audio. Additionally, they prohibit you from speaking out loud during the exam. You may mouth or whisper the words, but they do not allow you to speak. Once the exam commences, it is straightforward. There is a calculator in the application, as well as a “scratch pad” where you may type things. Be warned, you may not go back to questions once you move on.

When I was taking the SIE, I felt confident once I got to this point, since I was mostly worried about complying with the security checks. However, there is protocol from Prometric should you be disconnected from the application for any reason. I was disconnected with just six questions left (!), so it would have been helpful to know this ahead of time. Needless to say, I panicked. Prometric recommends a wired internet connection for this reason, but I gambled with wifi. Ultimately this was not the reason I was disconnected (my internet connection was fine), but the application automatically closed and I was forced to consult the FAQ.

From here, Prometric recommended that I check my internet connection, wait three minutes, restart my computer, and relaunch the exam. This proved to be perfect advice, and I was readmitted to the system. I had to re-do the entire security check with a new set of proctors, but my test time was paused and my progress had been saved. I finished my last six questions without a hitch. In other words, if you are disconnected, do not panic and simply follow their directions on the FAQ. If the issue persists, they recommend that you contact support.

As with the in person exams, my preliminary results were shown at the conclusion of the exam, and I was free to continue with my work day. All in all, the process was relatively user-friendly, and well worth it since I was able to avoid going to a testing center.

FINRA and NASAA launch online testing service for six securities exams

FINRA and the NASAA are now offering Prometric’s ProProctor remote assessment service which allows you to choose where and when you take your security exam. This user-friendly testing platform Continue reading

FINRA and the NASAA are now offering Prometric’s ProProctor remote assessment service  which allows you to choose where and when you take your security exam. This user-friendly testing platform offers self-service capabilities, with live agents available at all times to offer support for candidates if required. 

ProProctor features advanced security measures to ensure the same safety standard is being met comparable to conventional test centers, guaranteeing a consistent and fair testing experience for all candidates. These advanced security measures include multiple ID authentication and facial detection checks, personal security checks, 100% live-monitoring, 360-degree environmental readiness checks, live security agents, proactive protocols such as device checks, as well as record and review functionalities.

Each test candidate is assigned three agents to ensure the exam is administered safely and securely, with a proctor present throughout the entire test.

In order to access Prometric’s ProProctor system, you must install an application on your laptop or desktop and perform a system check. 

It is important to note the following difference with exams at the traditional test center: online tests via ProProctor are forward-moving only. No flagging a question and returning to it. No changing your answer.

The online exams have an onscreen calculator, a virtual scratchpad to capture your notes digitally as well as highlight and strikethrough functionality, which allow you to mark through or bring attention to the portions of the displayed exam question. 

Test-takers and firms may schedule online test appointments for the following six exams: the  SIE, Series 6, Series 7, Series 63, Series 65, and Series 66.

To find out more about this exciting new testing option, go to FINRA’S information page or go to  Prometric’s ProProctor information page.