Practice makes perfect: Study for the Series 55 Equity Trader Exam with the new Solomon Series 55 Online Exam Simulator

Test your knowledge about piggybacking, pink sheets and MPIDs with our industry-leading online exam simulator for the FINRA Series 55 exam. Take short topic quizzes, full-length exams with immediate feedback or simulate Continue reading

Test your knowledge about piggybacking, pink sheets and MPIDs with our industry-leading online exam simulator for the FINRA Series 55 exam.  Take short topic quizzes, full-length exams with immediate feedback or simulate the real thing by taking full-length timed exams.  New questions are added regularly to the Solomon Exam Prep Series 55 question database so the product stays current in this fast-changing industry.

In a 2011 study, published in the journal Science, two Purdue University Psychologists showed that practicing memory retrieval via testing is the best strategy for learning.  For more information about the landmark study, click here.

The old saying is true:  Practice makes perfect … so start practicing for the Series 55 by clicking here!

Study Alert: New memory retention study finds reading hard copy is better than reading online

A University of Oregon study shows that readers of the printed New York Times “remember significantly more news stories than online news readers.” Continue reading

A University of Oregon study shows that readers of the printed New York Times “remember significantly more news stories than online news readers.”  Additionally, the study shows that print readers “remember significantly more topics than online newsreaders” and that print readers remembered “more main points of news stories.”

For anyone studying for an exam and thinking about what type of study material to use, this study from Arthur D. Santana, Randall Livingstone and Yoon Cho is something to be aware of.  Click on the following link below for the full article:

http://img.slate.com/media/66/MediumMatters.pdf.

Napping Increases Learning

A new study at the University of California, Berkeley found that a nap increased the brain’s ability to learn and remember names and faces. Continue reading

A new study at the University of California, Berkeley found that a nap increased the brain’s ability to learn and remember names and faces. The study tested volunteers on name and face recognition twice, once at noon and once at 6 pm. The subjects who napped between sessions raised their scores by 10% on average, the subjects who didn’t nap actually scored 10% lower, on average, on the second test. Sleep helps the brain “like a dry sponge, to absorb new information” according to Professor Mathew P. Walker, the lead investigator, quoted in the New York Times. “You need to sleep before learning, to prepare your brain.”

Take this to heart and if you can, take a break from your study routine and nap between learning sessions.

Can listening to audio books during sleep improve exam scores?

Research at Northwestern University, published in the journal Science, suggests that playing a reinforcing audio while sleeping might improve Continue reading

Research at Northwestern University, published in the journal Science, suggests that playing a reinforcing audio while sleeping might improve retention of information already learned.

Science Online

Northwestern University

Study and Test-taking Tips From Memory Research

Research shows that time spent studying is a very important factor in how much you learn. For example, it has been shown that simply reading material Continue reading

Research shows that time spent studying is a very important factor in how much you learn. For example, it has been shown that simply reading material twice, rather than once, greatly improves memory retention. However, time is not the only factor in learning and in preparing for an exam. The quality of time spent studying is also critically important. For example, rather than trying to learn something all at once, try to pace your learning over a longer period of time and take breaks. So called “spaced” or “distributed” learning is much more effective than “cramming” at the last minute. Testing yourself has also been shown to substantially increase long-term recall which means that the more quizzes and practice questions you do, the better prepared you will be for your exam. Finally, studies show that mnemonics help, especially those that create a mental image.

One last word of wisdom: avoid overconfidence at all costs! Studies show it is among the top reasons people do poorly on exams.